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Cat Vaccination Schedule

You have just brought home your new kitten and now you must take care of her health which includes knowing when to get your cat vaccinated with the proper vaccines. You will also need to know your local and state laws governing your pet's health. Generally, your state and local community require that certain shots should be given to your cat and at what intervals. Your veterinarian should know what these are and when they are to be administered. This article should be helpful and provide you with the information regarding the cat vaccination schedule so you are informed of what these requirements are for your pet.

Core and Noncore Vaccines

Experts agree on what vaccines are "core" for cats, i.e., what vaccines should be given to every cat and what vaccines are given only to certain cats (noncore). To vaccinate your cat with noncore vaccines depends upon a number of factors including: age, breed, health status of the cat, potential exposure to an animal that has a disease, the type of vaccine and how common the disease is in the geographical area where the cat lives or may visit should be considered.

Core Vaccines

The following core vaccines should be administered to your cat as recommended by the American Association of Feline Practitioners (AAFP):  feline panleukopenia (distemper), feline viral rhinotracheitis, and feline calicivirus every three years. But they also suggest that cats at a high risk of exposure to these diseases may benefit from more frequent vaccinations.

Since vaccinating every three years does not agree with the current manufacturers' directions of vaccinating annually, when to vaccinate, and with what, must be a personal (and informed) choice for each cat owner. Consult with your veterinarian to determine what is best for your cat.

Noncore Vaccines

The noncore vaccines include feline leukemia (FeLV), feline infectious peritonitis (FIP), Bordetella, and Chlamydophila. The AAFP recommends AGAINST FeLV vaccinations in adult totally indoor cats who have no exposure to other cats. It is suggested that all kittens, because they are most susceptible and their lifestyles may change, should receive an initial FeLV vaccination series. FIP and Giardia vaccinations are not recommended. The choice to use a Chlamydophila vaccine is based upon the prevalence of the disease and husbandry conditions.

In general, modified life virus (MLV) vaccines are preferred over killed vaccines because they stimulate immunity faster and longer.

The Need for Rabies Shots for Cats

There are a number of factors to consider when owners set up cat vaccination schedule for their cats, and the local veterinarian could help you decide when and how your cat should be vaccinated, including using cat boosters. The vaccination schedule will depend on the age of the cat, breed and breeding potential, overall health, susceptibility to disease and geographic location. Once a cat vaccination schedule is set up, you should not delay or skip any vaccinations, as this could be detrimental to your cat's health.

The rabies shot is also required annually or every three years in many parts of the United States of America. This is especially true if you are taking your pet on vacation with you into another state. Most states require your cat have their shots up to date and rabies. It is recommended that you bring along a copy of your pets shot history as some may require to look at it.

Cat Vaccination Schedule

It is recommended by most veterinarians that you have your cat vaccinated for the different various diseases listed below at the times listed.

Exposure or risk of exposure and vaccine types may vary the schedule for your cat, of course. Be sure to check with your veterinarian to make sure that they have the vaccines available before you go in to the office. It is also recommended that your read all the literature on the vaccines that you can so that you are aware of the risks
associated with the different vaccinations.

Kittens are born with antibodies from the mother causing many vaccines not to take hold and in turn immunize the cat from infection. This is why most immunizations are given twice between 10 weeks and 14 weeks of age. After the first two, most vaccines are given at a one year interval and then every three years.

8 weeks:

Pneumonitis
Distemper vaccine
Intestinal parasite screen
Strategic de-worming (for intestinal parasites)

8 to 10 weeks:

Calcivirus
Feline Leukemia Virus/FIV test
Feline Leukemia vaccine (only for cats at high risk)
Panleucopia
Rhinotracheitis
Distemper vaccine
Intestinal parasite screen
Strategic de-worming (for intestinal parasites)

12 to 14 weeks:

Calcivirus
Feline Leukemia Virus
Panleucopenia
Rhinotracheitis
Distemper vaccine

2 to 4 months:

Feline Leukemia Virus

One Year:

One-year Rabies vaccine
Strategic de-worming (for intestinal parasites)
Feline Leukemia vaccine (only for cats at high risk)

Final Thoughts

Keep in mind this is a generic list and your veterinarian's plan for your individual cat's treatment may vary. Some vaccines that are given to your cat will vary depending upon where you live. Your local veterinarian should know the requirements for the vaccines that must be given to your cat and when.

Article Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/pets-articles/cat-vaccination-schedule-3859823.html

About the Author

I care about pet cats and dogs and just like to communicate information to help new and existing pet owners take good care of their pets. Visit my website at http://www.petsstore4u.com. There you will find other great cat articles and stuff to buy for your cat.

 



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